Press & Reviews:

Jigsaw

Jigsaw
(AUSTRALIAN)

Sydney A Rosa Colosimo Films production. Produced by Colosimo. Directed by Marc Gracia, Screenplay, Gracie, Chris Thompson, from a story by Colosimo: camera (Eastmancolor), James Grant; editor, Nicolas Lee; music, Dalmazio Babare; sound, John McKerrow, production design, Chris Kennedy; production manager, Simon Rosenthal; assistant director, Paul Healey, casting, Angelo Salmanca. Reviewed at Mosman screening room, Sydney, Oct.. 31, 1989. Running time: 89 MIN.
Virginia York . . . . . . . . Rebecca Gibney
Det-Const. Broulle .. . .Dominic Sweeney
Ed Minter . . . . . .. . . . . . Nico Lathouris
Gordon Camll . . .. . . . . Gary Day
Jack McClusky . .. . . .. .Terence Donovan
Aaron York . . . . .. . . . . Michael Coard
Ray Carpenter . . .. . . . . James Wrigh t
Laura Carpenter .. . . . . Peppie D'Or
Ted Lanski . . . . ... . . . . Peter Black
Alex York . . . . . .. . . . . David Bradshaw
Oliver Kady . . . .. . .. .. John Flaus
Jlean . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . Brenda Addie

This intriguing thriller, though modest in scale, looms as one of the most successful to date from the Rosa Colosimo stable. Nevertheless, it is better suited to video and the tube than to theatrical release.
Pic opens with the discovery of the body of Alex York (David Bradshaw) on a rocky beach; seems Alex, a real estate developer, was married for only a day to Virginia (Rebecca Gibney) following a whirlwind relationship - Virginia has never even been to her husband's apartment.
Investigating cop Broulle (Dominic Sweeney) sniffs around and discovers shady development deals involving the local Mayor (Terence Donovan) who is chummy with a nervous politico (Gary Day), Virginia, meanwhile, discovers that Alex had an ex-wife and teen son (Michael Coard) she knew nothing about. She's also being followed by a mean looking type (Nico Lathouris) who seems to be trying to kill her.
Director Marc Gracie (who helmed the Colosimo production "Blowing Hot And Cold" last year) does an ok job with this material but stages his action scenes without real conviction. A mid-film chase scene through suburban streets passes muster, but the final shootout between Sweeney and Lathouris, both clinging onto the car Gibney is driving at speed, stretches credulity,
Still, scenes such as the one where the bride/widow hears her dead husband's voice on his answering machine, or discovers a tape in which he reveals his love for her, do carry a charge.

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